T A R T I N E

Art curated by Brianna Toth at Tartine Bakery in San Francisco.

Ashley Thayer, photography by Brandon Joseph Baker

Installation shots of Aequum by Ashley Thayer

November 16th 2011 - January 18th 2012

All photography by Brandon Joseph Baker

Resist Dyeing Workshop with Ashley Thayer at Gravel & Gold

Monday, January 16, 2012

5pm - 8pm

I have a dream… to dye my own fabric!

This Martin Luther King Jr. Day our friend and latest lady-inspiriation dye/quilt/color artist Ashley Thayer will be hosting a resist dyeing workshop for all of you dye-hards. She recently studied with Elin Noble at Penland School of Crafts and now, this new year, she’s sharing her knowledge with us! Can I get a SEY YES!?!

In this session we will be playing with resist techniques inspired by dyers from Bamako to Arimatsu. Basic immersion dyeing recipes for procion mx dyes will be demonstrated and other techniques will be discussed.  A set of four 20″ x 20″ napkins of a cotton/linen blend will be provided for each person to work with. You are also invited to bring prewashed white cellulosic fiber (no silk or wool this time) if you want to dye some yardage to use for Quilting for Newbies later in the week!

It is suggested to bring:
-Dishwashing gloves (any plastic gloves, the higher the better, if you can cuff them- bonus)
-Any additional undyed and PREWASHED cotton or linen fabric- white or natural

The workshop will take place on Monday January 16th at 5:00pm at the Mama Lion Annex in the Duboce Triangle.
(Address will be provided upon RSVP) Sliding Scale: Suggested $60 donation for instruction & materials.

Limited to 10 people: Please RSVP to em@gravelandgold.com

http://gravelandgold.com/events/resist-dyeing-workshop-with-ashley-thayer/

                              

Ashley Thayer at Tartine Bakery

15 November 2011 
Cassie McGettigan

Aequum, Ashley Thayer’s installation of hand-dyed textiles, quilts, and paintings is opening tomorrow night at Tartine Bakery. We are delighted, as well, to offer a selection of Ashley’s scarves and napkins here at the shop….we’re also planning to offer a workshop with Ashley to come soon down the line. Much to enjoy!

Curious about the ceramics here? I was. Aren’t they marvelous! They’re by Zachary Leener, whose work I’ve much admired down at Iko Iko.

Quilts
ASHLEY THAYER

The work of Ashley Thayer. I love how her work naturally crosses back and forth from quilts to paintings. I can’t wait to see them in person.

The chemistry of salt water, our own pH, the suction of a wave: the antihierarchy that nature presents is addressed by human perception through our endless, often abstract, narratives. By orchestrating the emotion of painterly color and the rationality within the geometry of quilts, Ashley Thayer creates striking visual abstractions to materialize such narratives. Thayer practices low immersion, vat dyeing, shibori, and various resist techniques used in Africa and India, allowing water to carry and resist marks on fiber. “My work with dyes and quilting has come directly out of my painting process. Everything I am doing with fabrics I did in paper or wood first. Creating color with dye allows me to be much more deliberate and thoughtful because of the physicality of it and the steps involved in the mixing process… . Dyeing is an indirect application of pigment to the surface. It is a precise science but there will always be something uncontrollable about it, something unexpected due to all of the variables.” For these processes Thayer uses reactive MX dyes, acid dyes, indigo, and natural dyes from botanicals foraged around her home in Los Angeles; some of which include tea leaves, rust, seaweed, mangos, beetroot, black eyed susan and eucalyptus bark.

The word aequum is the Latin adjective for impartial, equal, even, calm or fair. Aside from the general attributes of the term, aequum also references how each series of work uses equal increments of measurement. In many of Thayer’s quilts, triangles of equal size are used like building blocks to create the larger patterns that seem to multiply infinitely within the work. For Thayer shape and form are expressed in measurement through the use of math, geometry and drafting in her creative process.

”There is no physical ‘pattern’ that I use to trace a quilt off of. I am drawing a graph and deconstructing it. I think about the math of composing music. I am visualizing a song. I love that certain relationships come into play again and again, some measurements seem unlikely but they work. Knowing that hundreds of years ago quilters were adept at this geometry makes the application of numbers seem human, shared, and a comfort.”

If you are in the San Francisco area, Ashley’s work will be up at Tartine through January.

**All images are from Ashley Thayer’s website. The italicized text is from the Tartine blog.

http://blog.littlepaperplanes.com/ashley-thayer/

Mention in Apartment Therapy

  

Ashley Thayer at Tartine: Quilts, Paintings, Dyeings

Not content to simply craft painstakingly-constructed quilts, artist Ashley Thayer hand-dyes the fabric first, using “reactive MX dyes, acid dyes, indigo, and natural dyes from botanicals foraged around her home in Los Angeles.” The opening reception for her exhibition at Tartine Bakery is tomorrow night!

I don’t know which of Ashley’s works will be on display (and for sale) at Tartine — and I wouldn’t want to ruin the surprise anyway — so I’ve picked my favorites to show you.

  • This quilt looks so indulgent- it seems to have the luxuriousness of velvet.
  • I love the quilt-inspired paintings, and Crystals (Idaho) is my favorite.
  • Log Cabin Straight Furrow juxtaposes the rigid structure of log cabin quilting with cosmically-dyed fabric.
  • Just listen to the elements that went into the creation of this subtle ”dyeing”: Seaweed, sea water, eucalyptus bark, eucalyptus leaves, tin, tea leaves, rust, ashes, soy. Incredible.
  • I could see the gentle colors of Ashley’s napkins pairing very well with Heath Ceramicsdishes.


Aequuum Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 16th from 8pm - 10pm at Tartine Bakery, 600 Guerrero Street San Francisco. The show, curated by Brianna Toth, runs until January 18th. Ashley’s work will also be available at Gravel & Gold.

- Tess Wilson

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/art/ashley-thayer-at-tartine-quilts-paintings-dyeings-160377

Poster by Paul Morgan
Hand dyed items will also be available at Gravel & Gold!!!

Poster by Paul Morgan

Hand dyed items will also be available at Gravel & Gold!!!

ASHLEY THAYER
Aequum


Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 16th from 8pm - 10pm


November 16th - January 18th


The chemistry of salt water, our own pH, the suction of a wave: the antihierarchy that nature presents is addressed by human perception through our endless, often abstract, narratives. By orchestrating the emotion of painterly color and the rationality within the geometry of quilts, Ashley Thayer creates striking visual abstractions to materialize such narratives. Thayer practices low immersion, vat dyeing, shibori, and various resist techniques used in Africa and India, allowing water to carry and resist marks on fiber. “My work with dyes and quilting has come directly out of my painting process. Everything I am doing with fabrics I did in paper or wood first. Creating color with dye allows me to be much more deliberate and thoughtful because of the physicality of it and the steps involved in the mixing process… . Dyeing is an indirect application of pigment to the surface. It is a precise science but there will always be something uncontrollable about it, something unexpected due to all of the variables.”For these processes Thayer uses reactive MX dyes, acid dyes, indigo, and natural dyes from botanicals foraged around her home in Los Angeles; some of which include tea leaves, rust, seaweed, mangos, beetroot, black eyed susan and eucalyptus bark.

The word aequum is the Latin adjective for impartial, equal, even, calm or fair. Aside from the general attributes of the term, aequum also references how each series of work uses equal increments of measurement. In many of Thayer’s quilts, triangles of equal size are used like building blocks to create the larger patterns that seem to multiply infinitely within the work. For Thayer shape and form are expressed in measurement through the use of math, geometry and drafting in her creative process.

There is no physical ‘pattern’ that I use to trace a quilt off of. I am drawing a graph and deconstructing it. I think about the math of composing music. I am visualizing a song. I love that certain relationships come into play again and again, some measurements seem unlikely but they work. Knowing that hundreds of years ago quilters were adept at this geometry makes the application of numbers seem human, shared, and a comfort.”

Included in Aequum are a number of paintings which serve as studies for the textile pieces that surround them. Thayer draws inspiration from the quilting traditions of Amish, early colonial and Native American quiltmakers, as well as the improvisation in “Afro-traditional” quilts. The creative intentions of the work in Aequum are aligned with the quiltmaker’s piety demonstrated in Amish quilts and the physiological, healing motives behind Emma Kunz’s large-scale pencil drawings.

Ashley Thayer was born in Austin, Texas and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design where she earned her BFA. She has shown her work internationally. Her photographs have been printed by Foam Magazine and RVCA, her paintings have been used by Keep Company and Consolidated Skateboards, and she has taught indigo dyeing to students in the Bay Area. She most recently studied with dyer/artist Elin Noble at Penland School of Crafts.

http://ashleythayer.com/
www.maricolous.com

EMILY GABLE So, where do you summer?
August 31st - October 5th  
Does buying a bit of an ocean give you the right to the whole body of water? Where does property ownership and the boundaries of groundwater access intersect? Can boundaries be placed upon a property that is continually in flux, or whose depths are not fully charted? Similarly, can something physically fluid become static or contained according to the laws of ownership? These questions are all relevant when looking at Emily Gable’s drawings of waves and aquifers, which are dissected by imaginary property lines. So, where do you summer? examines potential ways that these bodies of water can be understood differently, as their geographic parameters shrink and expand with the different borders placed upon them presenting new definitions.After moving back to the Bay Area from NYC Gable settled in the Sunset District near Ocean Beach. While spending regular time by the ocean she began to bring back jars of ocean water to her house – an exercise that led to the examination of water rights and the foundation for her current artwork. In addition to the drawings of waves, tide pools, inlets and aquifers there are also 40 jars of water collected by the artist. Each jar has a hand-painted label identifying the location and water content. While these jars serve as a visual representation of the passage of time, they also question the accessibility of their contents, which are placed beyond the reach of the viewer on a lofted shelf. This intentional “display” of these jars also serves as a foil for the commodification of water as a lucrative product. While doing research for her drawings, Gable found that property laws did not necessarily account for depth. Historically this led to people mining beneath their competitors for valuable minerals or deposits, such as water or oil. Since aquifers are small layers of groundwater that are extracted using a water well, these issues of ownership come directly into play. Conversely a wave is created by a mass of flowing water moving from one location to another within a larger body of water. By looking at these two examples once can understand the contradictions of systematized borders, as well as exclusivity of ownership and access. 
Emily Gable is a San Francisco based artist currently working in a variety of media. So, where do you summer? is her first exhibition in San Francisco after moving back to the Bay Area from New York. She graduated from Hunter College with a BA in Visual Art and has participated in public performances at various art festivals including the Performance & Visual Art Showcase in Chez Bushwick and Aqua Art Fair. Emily lives near the ocean, which influences the subject matter of her recent work. 
http://tartine.tumblr.com/ http://emilygable.blogspot.com/

EMILY GABLE 
So, where do you summer?


August 31st - October 5th 


Does buying a bit of an ocean give you the right to the whole body of water? Where does property ownership and the boundaries of groundwater access intersect? Can boundaries be placed upon a property that is continually in flux, or whose depths are not fully charted? Similarly, can something physically fluid become static or contained according to the laws of ownership? These questions are all relevant when looking at Emily Gable’s drawings of waves and aquifers, which are dissected by imaginary property lines. So, where do you summer? examines potential ways that these bodies of water can be understood differently, as their geographic parameters shrink and expand with the different borders placed upon them presenting new definitions.

After moving back to the Bay Area from NYC Gable settled in the Sunset District near Ocean Beach. While spending regular time by the ocean she began to bring back jars of ocean water to her house – an exercise that led to the examination of water rights and the foundation for her current artwork.

In addition to the drawings of waves, tide pools, inlets and aquifers there are also 40 jars of water collected by the artist. Each jar has a hand-painted label identifying the location and water content. While these jars serve as a visual representation of the passage of time, they also question the accessibility of their contents, which are placed beyond the reach of the viewer on a lofted shelf. This intentional “display” of these jars also serves as a foil for the commodification of water as a lucrative product.

While doing research for her drawings, Gable found that property laws did not necessarily account for depth. Historically this led to people mining beneath their competitors for valuable minerals or deposits, such as water or oil. Since aquifers are small layers of groundwater that are extracted using a water well, these issues of ownership come directly into play. Conversely a wave is created by a mass of flowing water moving from one location to another within a larger body of water. By looking at these two examples once can understand the contradictions of systematized borders, as well as exclusivity of ownership and access.


Emily Gable is a San Francisco based artist currently working in a variety of media. So, where do you summer? is her first exhibition in San Francisco after moving back to the Bay Area from New York. She graduated from Hunter College with a BA in Visual Art and has participated in public performances at various art festivals including the Performance & Visual Art Showcase in Chez Bushwick and Aqua Art Fair. Emily lives near the ocean, which influences the subject matter of her recent work.


http://tartine.tumblr.com/

http://emilygable.blogspot.com/